Boomerang Buyers Return to Market After Foreclosure


This CNN Money article points out how many who lost their homes to foreclosure and short sales are taking a fresh start at home ownership.
boomerangBorrowers who lost homes to foreclosure during the housing bust are starting to buy again. Since the housing bubble
burst, 4.8 million borrowers have lost their homes to foreclosure, and another 2.2 million gave them up in short sales, according to RealtyTrac. While many are still struggling to recover financially, a growing number are starting to bounce
back — and they are looking for a new place to call home.

Susan Edwards and her husband, Dave, lost their Palmdale, Calif., home in 2010 after Susan’s severe arthritis made it impossible for her to work her medical device sales job. The medical bills soon piled up and the couple could no longer afford their $2,300 monthly mortgage payment. In addition, their home’s value had plunged 40 percent below the $325,000 mortgage balance.

“We were living under such pressure,” she said. “We looked at the numbers and knew we had to default.” After the foreclosure, Susan’s credit score had taken a 70-point hit; Dave’s score fell even further. By paying all of the bills on time, they nursed their credit scores back to health. And in December, two years after they lost their old home, the couple was able to buy a new home with a loan backed by the Veteran’s Administration. VA-insured loans can be obtained just two years after a foreclosure, according to the Mike Frueh, director of the VA’s Loan Guaranty Program.

The new house is a lot like the Edwards’ old one, with one big improvement: The mortgage payment is $1,150 a month — roughly half the amount they used to pay. “[After bankruptcy], foreclosure is one of the things that hits your credit score the hardest,” said Anthony Sprauve, a spokesman for FICO. Foreclosures and short sales usually knock about 85 to 160 points off a credit score. Scores suffer less if you pay at least the minimum on all your other bills on time and only allow your mortgage payments to go unpaid, said Jon Maddux, the CEO of YouWalkAway.com, which offers advice to defaulting mortgage borrowers.

Once the damage is done, it can take three to seven years for a score to fully recover. But some lenders are willing to work with borrowers earlier than that. Mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, for example, require defaulters to wait five years — and have a minimum credit score of 680 and put 10 percent down — before they can purchase a home again. If they don’t meet that criteria, the wait is seven years, at which point the foreclosure is expunged from a person’s credit report.

If defaulters show that extenuating circumstances caused the foreclosure — such as a health issue that prevented them from working, a layoff, a divorce or other one-time event — the wait may be reduced to three years. The Federal Housing Administration allows banks to issue FHA-insured loans to borrowers three years after a foreclosure or a short sale in which the borrower was in default.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s